Traditional Guineo Vinegar

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Traditional Guineo Vinegar

In the Guajira Department the population used to produce a vinegar made with guineo fino and guineo manzano; this second ingredient was the most used in preparing vinegar, as it gave the vinegar more acidity with a hint of sweetness, with a stronger scent, clearer color, and that simply flavored food better.   Both men and women took part in the preparation of vinegar, each with a well-defined role to play; the men carried the fruit and the women prepared it: washing the fruit, peeling the guineo, working it and then placing the container in a safe place for the fermentation process. The ingredients required to make the vinegar are boiling water, ripe guinea manzo, and salt, which was used to keep the vinegar from taking on a foul smell during fermentation. Some people also added garlic.   To make this vinegar: boil water, pour it into a container, add mature, peeled guineo and a bit of salt. After having placed all the ingredients in the container, close it and place it in a fresh and dry place. Let the mixture sit for four to five days, then drain and transfer to smaller bottles for use. When the vinegar is ready you can add ajì (local spicy pepper), onions, or pepper. This product is used as a spicy condiment. This traditional vinegar is a typical recipe that has been passed from generation to generation and it is the fundamental ingredient for such local dishes as pastel de cerdo, riso combinado, or de liga.   The historic production area is Dibulla, in the Guajira region, where it is produced in small quantities: about 20 bottles per week. This product is not on the market but it is prepared for family consumption. The risk of disappearing is tied to the standardization of tastes and the rather long time it takes to prepare this product; as such it is being replaced by commercial vinegars. The reduced cultivation of the guineo manzano is another reason this vinegar is disappearing. Climate change, the condition of the soil and diseases have further reduced the growing area of this plant, which is now found only sporadically and whose fruit is eaten fresh by the locals.

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Territory

StateColombia
Region

La Guajira

Other info

Categories

Vinegar