Dibulla Corn Alfajor

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Dibulla Corn Alfajor

Alfajor is a traditional Spanish dessert that came to the Americas during colonial times. In Colombia this dish is prepared with butter cookies filled with arequipe (a sweet cream made of milk and sugar). The edges are decorated with coconut flour and pieces of peanuts.   Dibulla Corn Alfajors are preferably made with white corn, panela (a sugar cane paste), coconut, and green pepper. They are different from other similar desserts because they are not cookies, they are not wafers, and they are not round. Traditional Dibulla Alfjors were square and rather hard, while the panela honey supplied a good consistency when cooled. The ingredients are: white corn, panela, coconut, and pepper. The preparation for this product is as follows: the corn is toasted with the skin still on and is then ground up; the pepper is ground as is the coconut flour, which is then cooked with the panela until it melts down; to this mixture are added the corn flour and the pepper. This paste is then cut into squares and left to cool until it hardens, when finally it is dusted with more corn flour.   This is a brown dessert, with golden shades thanks to the corn; it is delicious thanks to the mixture of sweet and spicy. When anyone in the town had a face full of dust people would say that they were “dusted like an alfajor,” because the treats were covered in flour before being sold. This product is typical of the La Guajira region, especially in the area around Dibulla. Though there are no sure estimates of how much is produced per year, there may be up to 100 portions prepared every day. This product is not for sale on the market, as it is cooked for home consumption.   The reason this product has nearly disappeared is tied to the change in culture. Coming into contact with nearby town and other peoples, traditional products have lost their charm. Another possible reason is that the original recipe has not been shared very much; younger people do not even know the exact process for making this dessert. Finally, white corn cultivation has decreased significantly, substituted today with yellow corn.

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Territory

StateColombia
Region

La Guajira

Other info

Categories

Cakes, pastries and sweets