Carlin Peas

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Carlin Peas

Carlin peas, also known as black peas, are sold dried or in packs from grocers and supermarkets, or offered cooked in portions of about 75-100 g. The peas come in two colours, a brown hue and a reddish hue. With enough sunlight and water, the plant grows to a height of approximately 1.3 meters. Carlin peas are an abundant crop that can be eaten in various ways; some people prefer to eat them fresh, the peas are cooked and heavily seasoned with vinegar, which gives them an earthy taste. They can also be consumed from the dried state: the dried peas are soaked in cold water with bicarbonate soda for 24 hours, cooked and fried in butter and eaten in winter for Bonfire Night (November 5). Carlin peas are known as ‘Carlin’ because they were traditionally eaten on Carlin Sunday in Lent in the Christian calendar; on this day children are usually served hot Carlin peas in a little cup at the end of a church service. Carlin peas, also known as black, parched or maple peas, are a traditional Lancashire dish often served on or around Bonfire Night. Depending on the circumstances it can be a festive dish, a Lent dish, an everyday dish or a pub snack. It was formerly a staple British foodstuff, especially in Lancashire. The availability of Carlin peas varies throughout the year; they are typically eaten fresh during the Lent period in spring and the remainder left to dry for winter use during the Bonfire Night. As they are common only during specific times of the year, they therefore tend to be replaced by different pea varieties.

Photo: @Hodmedod’s 

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