San Quirino Bean

Slow Food Presidium

Italy

Friuli Venezia Giulia

Legumes

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San Quirino Bean

Interviews with older generations and history books reveal that beans, lentils and favas were already being grown around San Quirino, a small town near Pordenone, as far back as the start of the 1800s. The economic value of San Quirino beans back then was surprisingly significant, and at the Pordenone market they would command higher prices than oats or corn.
The Saint Quirino bean belongs to the the species Phaseolus vulgaris
The typical variety has an elongated shape, a pale-brown color and a white eye with a dark brown iris. The beans were traditionally harvested manually, by pulling up the dwarf plants, planted in rows, and leaving them to dry before beating them with wooden sticks to extract the seeds from their pods. The beans would be left to dry in the sun for a few days and then stored in jute sacks.
After cooking, the bean’s skin becomes very thin and almost undetectable while the flesh remains compact and smooth, characteristics that make it unique. The beans are excellent in soups like pasta e fagioli alla friulana or the typical fasoi e frumenton, which is prepared by soaking beans and wheat then cooking them for around two hours with chopped lardo, parsley, oil, potatoes, salt and pepper.

Season

The San Quirino bean is harvested in July and is available dried year-round.

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Even though these beans historically were very valuable to the small town of San Quirino, from the 20th century on their cultivation almost entirely disappeared, surviving only in a few kitchen gardens. A handful of young growers have now recovered the seed and returned to cultivating the beans in the traditional way, harvesting, drying and threshing them by hand. The Presidium’s objective is to revive this variety, increasing the number of growers and promoting the bean including through collaborations with restaurants and osterias in the area.

Production area:
San Quirino municipality and surroundings, Pordenone province

Presidium supported by:
Municipality of San Quirino, Bcc Pordenonese

Donato Arnese
Via Cesare Battisti 43/b
San Quirino (Pn)
Tel. +39 349 6103158
info@fagioloanticodisanquirino.it

Cristian Rossi Mel
Via Monte Grappa 6
San Quirino (Pn)
Tel. +39 340 7772462
roberta.rossimel@libero.it

Walter Zamuner
Via Cesare Battisti 7/a
San Quirino (Pn)
Tel. +39 338 6432878
walter.zamuner@yahoo.it

Slow Food Presidium Coordinator
Emiliano Buffo
Tel. +39 339 2152188
ebuff@libero.it

Presidium Producers’ Coordinator
Donato Arnese
Tel. +39 349 6103158
info@fagioloanticodisanquirino.it
Even though these beans historically were very valuable to the small town of San Quirino, from the 20th century on their cultivation almost entirely disappeared, surviving only in a few kitchen gardens. A handful of young growers have now recovered the seed and returned to cultivating the beans in the traditional way, harvesting, drying and threshing them by hand. The Presidium’s objective is to revive this variety, increasing the number of growers and promoting the bean including through collaborations with restaurants and osterias in the area.

Production area:
San Quirino municipality and surroundings, Pordenone province

Presidium supported by:
Municipality of San Quirino, Bcc Pordenonese

Donato Arnese
Via Cesare Battisti 43/b
San Quirino (Pn)
Tel. +39 349 6103158
info@fagioloanticodisanquirino.it

Cristian Rossi Mel
Via Monte Grappa 6
San Quirino (Pn)
Tel. +39 340 7772462
roberta.rossimel@libero.it

Walter Zamuner
Via Cesare Battisti 7/a
San Quirino (Pn)
Tel. +39 338 6432878
walter.zamuner@yahoo.it

Slow Food Presidium Coordinator
Emiliano Buffo
Tel. +39 339 2152188
ebuff@libero.it

Presidium Producers’ Coordinator
Donato Arnese
Tel. +39 349 6103158
info@fagioloanticodisanquirino.it

Territory

StateItaly
RegionFriuli Venezia Giulia

Other info

CategoriesLegumes