Paganica Beans

Italy

Abruzzo

Legumes

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Paganica Beans

Beans have been cultivated around Paganica, a hamlet near the town of L’Aquila, for hundreds of years, taking advantage of the deep, fresh, alluvial soil and the presence of waterways fed by mountain springs. Production is concentrated in the basin of the Vera River, whose springs flow from the slopes of the Gran Sasso. Until a few decades ago, this was an important business, with the beans sold locally but also in nearby provinces such as Terni and Rieti.
There are two varieties (ecotypes) of Paganica bean, both with a long life cycle (between 160 and 180 days). The climbing plants have white flowers and can grow up to 2 meters tall with the support of special willow poles. The two types of bean are different colors: The fagiolo a pane, also known as the fagiolo ad olio, is beige tending towards Havana or hazelnut brown and has a central eye, while the white bean, known as the fagiolo a pisello, is ivory white and slightly rounder.
The white bean tends to have a thinner skin and buttery flesh, and is more tender than the fagiolo ad olio, which however preserves more of its fragrance and flavor after cooking. The cooking time should always be brief, around 30 minutes, a sign of quality.
The beans can be cooked on their own and dressed simply with extra-virgin olive oil, salt and pepper, or they are also excellent in a local soup made with guanciale, another typical local product, and served with rustic bread.

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Season

Late spring with harvest in autumn

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Cultivating the Paganica beans is very labor intensive, due to weeding, carried out by hand; the arrangement of the wooden support poles (obtained from pruning the woods in the fall); the harvesting, also done by hand, over a period of a few weeks; and the separation of the beans from the dried pods. This is why production has fallen dramatically since the 1970s.
Additionally, wrong-headed political decisions have led to fertile land, ideal for bean cultivation, being turned over to industrial development and overbuilding, thanks in part to reconstruction following the 2009 earthquake.
The future of this crop is dependent on a small but highly motivated group of young growers who believe in the bean both as a source of income and as a driving force for the social revival of the local area. They are working to collect the seed from older growers and to manage cultivation in an environmentally friendly way.

Production area
Paganica, Tempera, San Gregorio, Bazzano and Onna hamlets, L'Aquila municipality

Presidium supported by
Gal Gran Sasso Velino
Antonello Angelini
via Luigio Biordi, 3F
Paganica - L'Aquila
tel. +39 349 3451746
antonelloangelini86@gmail.com

Emanuele Falerni
Via Paganica, 6
San Gregorio – L'Aquila
tel. +39 327 7864032
azienda.falerni@gmail.com

Matteo Griguoli
via Arco dei Giusti, 2B oppure Via della Perola
Paganica - L'Aquila
tel. +39 338 7398037
griguolimatteo@yahoo.it

Giuseppe Moro
Paganica - L'Aquila
Via delle Aie, 4
tel. +39 338 1693340
saraa1978@virgilio.it

Antonio Tennina
via Onna, 11
Paganica - L'Aquila
tel. +39 389 0812524
Slow Food Presidium coordinator
Giovanni Cialone
tel. +39 338 5861506
giovanni.cialone@gmail.com

Producers’ Presidium coordinator
Matteo Griguoli
tel. +39 338 7398037
griguolimatteo@yahoo.it
Cultivating the Paganica beans is very labor intensive, due to weeding, carried out by hand; the arrangement of the wooden support poles (obtained from pruning the woods in the fall); the harvesting, also done by hand, over a period of a few weeks; and the separation of the beans from the dried pods. This is why production has fallen dramatically since the 1970s.
Additionally, wrong-headed political decisions have led to fertile land, ideal for bean cultivation, being turned over to industrial development and overbuilding, thanks in part to reconstruction following the 2009 earthquake.
The future of this crop is dependent on a small but highly motivated group of young growers who believe in the bean both as a source of income and as a driving force for the social revival of the local area. They are working to collect the seed from older growers and to manage cultivation in an environmentally friendly way.

Production area
Paganica, Tempera, San Gregorio, Bazzano and Onna hamlets, L'Aquila municipality

Presidium supported by
Gal Gran Sasso Velino
Antonello Angelini
via Luigio Biordi, 3F
Paganica - L'Aquila
tel. +39 349 3451746
antonelloangelini86@gmail.com

Emanuele Falerni
Via Paganica, 6
San Gregorio – L'Aquila
tel. +39 327 7864032
azienda.falerni@gmail.com

Matteo Griguoli
via Arco dei Giusti, 2B oppure Via della Perola
Paganica - L'Aquila
tel. +39 338 7398037
griguolimatteo@yahoo.it

Giuseppe Moro
Paganica - L'Aquila
Via delle Aie, 4
tel. +39 338 1693340
saraa1978@virgilio.it

Antonio Tennina
via Onna, 11
Paganica - L'Aquila
tel. +39 389 0812524
Slow Food Presidium coordinator
Giovanni Cialone
tel. +39 338 5861506
giovanni.cialone@gmail.com

Producers’ Presidium coordinator
Matteo Griguoli
tel. +39 338 7398037
griguolimatteo@yahoo.it

Territory

StateItaly
RegionAbruzzo

Other info

CategoriesLegumes