Nanga Lauk Village’s Forest Honey

Slow Food Presidium

Indonesia

Honey

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Nanga Lauk Village’s Forest Honey

Nanga Lauk Village’s River and lake area provides a natural habitat for a diverse range of flowering plants. These plants serve as a crucial food source for Apis dorsata, a species of forest bee that relies on the surrounding natural bounty to produce high-quality honey. Among the many plant species that thrive in this environment, Putat trees (Barringtonia acutangula) and Tahun trees (Carallia bracteata) stand out as sources of nectar, making them essential ingredients in the production of premium forest honey.
The harvesting of forest honey has been a long-standing practice among the Tamambaloh Dayak and Malay communities of Nanga Lauk Village, dating back over a century. Traditionally, honey was gathered from hives located in tall trees (Lalau Honey) and low branches (Ropak Honey). In 1984, an innovative harvesting technique called “tikung” was introduced, involving wooden boards placed on tree branches to attract Apis dorsata bees. This method has since become a cornerstone of Nanga Lauk’s honey production, ensuring the sustainability of this traditional practice for future generations.
Nanga Lauk Village Forest Honey is a high-quality honey with a thick consistency, clear yellowish color, subtle flowery aroma, and a complex flavor profile with dominant sweetness, balanced bitterness, and a hint of sourness.
Forest beekeepers in Nanga Lauk Village have designated areas around lakes and rivers for honey collection, areas that are passed down through families and agreed upon by family members. Once an area is claimed by one beekeeper, other beekeepers are not allowed to set up honey collection boards there.
Honey harvesting in Nanga Lauk Village occurs twice annually, with the main harvest typically happening in December, January, or February, and a second harvest (temporang) taking place in May or June. The timing of the harvests depends on the availability of nectar from flowering plants in the area. Honey farmers prepare the Tikung trees by cleaning them before the flowers bloom, creating a favorable environment for the bees to thrive and produce ample honey.
Honey producers in Nanga Lauk Village coordinate their harvests to ensure efficiency and safety. The group leader determines the harvest time, and all farmers adhere to this schedule. Before harvesting, farmers inspect the hives to ensure they are ready. The harvest of Tikung honey occurs during the day (9am-3pm) and night (8pm-3am), while Lalau honey is harvested only on moonless nights. Each harvest typically yields 20-50 Tikung hives containing 3-5kg of honey, and 50-100 Lalau hives containing 7-8kg of honey, up to 15kg in optimal conditions. For both types of honey, farmers use Tebaok, a fumigant made from tree roots, to temporarily repel bees while harvesting. To protect the bee population, farmers leave 2-3cm of honey-filled combs in the hives to encourage the bees to return and continue producing honey.

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This presidium was launched to promote sustainable honey production, enhance farmers' management skills, establish fair business practices, and foster communication and knowledge-sharing among stakeholders within the village of Nanga Lauk.

25 beekepers are currently involved in the presidium

Area of Production
Nanga Lauk Village, Embaloh Hilir District, Kapuas Hulu Regency, Kalimantan, Indonesia.
Producers Presidium Coordinator
Imanul Huda
imanulhuda@yahoo.com
+62 812 9643 9987

Slow Food Presidium Coordinator
Erik Munandar
erik.prcfi@gmail.com
+62 815 2096 9621
This presidium was launched to promote sustainable honey production, enhance farmers' management skills, establish fair business practices, and foster communication and knowledge-sharing among stakeholders within the village of Nanga Lauk.

25 beekepers are currently involved in the presidium

Area of Production
Nanga Lauk Village, Embaloh Hilir District, Kapuas Hulu Regency, Kalimantan, Indonesia.
Producers Presidium Coordinator
Imanul Huda
imanulhuda@yahoo.com
+62 812 9643 9987

Slow Food Presidium Coordinator
Erik Munandar
erik.prcfi@gmail.com
+62 815 2096 9621

Territory

StateIndonesia

Other info

CategoriesHoney