Kyrgyz Mountain Horse

Slow Food Presidium

Kirgyzstan

Breeds and animal husbandry

Cured meats and meat products

Milk and milk products

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Kyrgyz Mountain Horse

In the craggy mountains of Kyrgyzstan, particularly the Naryn and Issyk-Kul terrains, shelter one of the world’s most ancient horse bloodlines. From the domestication of the wild horse to its modern state, the Kyrgyz horse has a history that dates back over 4,000 years. The Kyrgyz horse came about through a long process and complex mixing of aboriginal horses from different nomadic tribes, including the tarpan, a wild breed now extinct.
The Kyrgyz Mountain horse is a valuable breed with unique qualities. It is hardy, strong, and well-adapted to the harsh conditions of these mountains. This breed can easily graze the whole year, finding natural shelters.
This breed has distinctive physical traits, including thick manes and tails, a short and straight back, and short pasterns. These horses are typically dark or light in color, often unmarked. According to the classification by height at the withers, the Kyrgyz horse is included in the group of low and small horses by live weight.
The Kyrgyz Mountain horse is a low-maintenance breed with a natural ability to find food: about 80 percent of the daily ration consists of pastures and meadows grasses. It is also highly productive, making it a valuable resource for Kyrgyz nomads.
Kyrgyz horses are bred to be used as riding and carriage animals on mountainous off-road terrain. With a relatively high percentage of Kyrgyz horses with ambling and fast walking gaits, they are ridden at the age of 2 years , and for transportation of goods in the mountains at the age of over 5 years.
In addition to this purpose, they are bred for meat production and delicacies such as the koumiss, a fermented milk drink made from mare’s milk, that has therapeutic and prophylactic properties. Both the meat and the milk are rich in protein.

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The Kyrgyz Mountain horse has received the status of an independent breed in December 2O2O, but basically no actions were taken to specifically safeguard the breed, which nowadays is threaten to disappear, making the preservation the Kyrgyz horse population uniqueness very urgent. Hybridization during the Soviet period with other breeds of horses led to the disappearance of the pure breed, which is now found only in the more remote mountainous areas of the country. The establishment of the Presidium aims at enhancing the value of this indigenous breed and the promotion of related food products.
Presidium supported by IFAD (International Fund for Agricultural Development)

Area of production
lssyk-Kul, Naryn and Chuy regions
27 producers from different areas of the country.

Slow Food Coordinator
Anara Momunova
amomunova977@gmail.com
+996 700 875 927

Producers Coordinator
Ishenbek Usubaliev
usubaliev.ishenbek@mail.ru
+996(705)153891
The Kyrgyz Mountain horse has received the status of an independent breed in December 2O2O, but basically no actions were taken to specifically safeguard the breed, which nowadays is threaten to disappear, making the preservation the Kyrgyz horse population uniqueness very urgent. Hybridization during the Soviet period with other breeds of horses led to the disappearance of the pure breed, which is now found only in the more remote mountainous areas of the country. The establishment of the Presidium aims at enhancing the value of this indigenous breed and the promotion of related food products.
Presidium supported by IFAD (International Fund for Agricultural Development)

Area of production
lssyk-Kul, Naryn and Chuy regions
27 producers from different areas of the country.

Slow Food Coordinator
Anara Momunova
amomunova977@gmail.com
+996 700 875 927

Producers Coordinator
Ishenbek Usubaliev
usubaliev.ishenbek@mail.ru
+996(705)153891

Territory

StateKirgyzstan