Beneventano Saragolla Bread

Slow Food Presidium

Italy

Campania

Bread and baked goods

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Beneventano Saragolla Bread

Saragolla is an heirloom variety of durum wheat, still cultivated in the inland areas of the Sannio, in the province of Benevento. It was introduced to Italy from the Middle East in 400 AD by people arriving from what is now Bulgaria. The variety’s name comes from that language group, from the union of sarga (“seed”) and golyo (“yellow”). Various historic documents, some dating back to the Middle Ages, refer to Saragolla and mention its quality and its hardiness (the variety is particularly resistant to lodging and to diseases like rust). Over time, it developed slightly different characteristics depending on the cultivation area, leading to a population of Saragolla formed of several different types: Zingaresca, Bulgara, Saragolla Turchesco, Bulgara di Capo Palinuro and Saragolletta del Sannio.
The wheat produces a fragrant flour, bright yellow in color, which is used to make a traditional bread. The semolina flour is mixed with a sourdough starter (passed down through generations of bakers), and the mixture is kept warm overnight before being mixed with more flour, water, leavening and salt. The second rising lasts for around three to four hours. The dough is then formed into round loaves and the tops are cut across before the bread is baked in a wood-burning oven. The crust is thin and brown with darker patches and lightly floured. The crumb is dense and yellowish-beige in color, with small, regular holes and an elastic, moist texture. On the nose, the fragrance is intense, with notes of dried fruit, toast and honey. The flavor tends to be quite sweet, but has a good sapidity. The bread’s many uses include in bread soup, for bruschetta and for sampling newly produced extra-virgin olive oil from the Sannite area.

Season

The bread is baked weekly throughout the year

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The Sannio Beneventano area, along with Abruzzo and Basilicata, is one of the few parts of Italy where Saragolla is still cultivated. Here it has managed to resist competition from the durum wheats introduced from North Africa and the Middle East in the 19th century, and from the Senatore Cappelli variety during the last century. Depopulation in the area and the reduction of cultivated land has however sent production of both the wheat and the bread into crisis. All too often, traditional bakeries are closing, and with them we are losing an ancient body of knowledge. The Presidium has been started to recreate the entire production chain, from the farmers growing the grain to the millers who turn the wheat into semolina flour to the Benevento bakers.

Production area
The wheat is grown throughout the Sannio Beneventano area, while the bread is baked in Benevento province.

Presidium supported by
Region of Campania
Producers

Antico Forno
di Antonio Pennino
Via Don Luigi Sturzo, 4
Benevento (Bn)
Tel. +39 348 8683131
penninorino@gmail.com

L’Antico Rifugio del Tasso
di Emanuela Popovici
Via Cautano Frasso
Cautano (Bn)
Tel. +39 389 2183104
giovanniauriema1004@gmail.com

Fontana Stella
di Franca Norelli
Via Bocca,56
Frasso Telesino (Bn)
Tel. +39 347 9744898
f.norelli@hotmail.it

Nunzia Veronica Iannelli
Contrada Roseto
Benevento (Bn)
Tel. +39 338 8426556
collinadiroseto@tim.it

Giovanni Minicozzi
Contrada San Giuseppe
Paduli (Bn)
Tel. +39 334 3658173
giovanniminicozzi@gmail.com

Mirra
di Donatina Piacquadio
Contrada Paritola
San Nicola Manfredi (Bn)
Tel. +39 347 7663824
donatinapiacquadio@gmail.com

Pasquale Sagnella
Via San Salvatore, 28
San Lorenzello (Bn)
Tel. +39 320 8143273
Slow Food Coordinator
Giancarlo De Luca
Tel. +39 335 7288691
giancarlodeluca@tin.it
The Sannio Beneventano area, along with Abruzzo and Basilicata, is one of the few parts of Italy where Saragolla is still cultivated. Here it has managed to resist competition from the durum wheats introduced from North Africa and the Middle East in the 19th century, and from the Senatore Cappelli variety during the last century. Depopulation in the area and the reduction of cultivated land has however sent production of both the wheat and the bread into crisis. All too often, traditional bakeries are closing, and with them we are losing an ancient body of knowledge. The Presidium has been started to recreate the entire production chain, from the farmers growing the grain to the millers who turn the wheat into semolina flour to the Benevento bakers.

Production area
The wheat is grown throughout the Sannio Beneventano area, while the bread is baked in Benevento province.

Presidium supported by
Region of Campania
Producers

Antico Forno
di Antonio Pennino
Via Don Luigi Sturzo, 4
Benevento (Bn)
Tel. +39 348 8683131
penninorino@gmail.com

L’Antico Rifugio del Tasso
di Emanuela Popovici
Via Cautano Frasso
Cautano (Bn)
Tel. +39 389 2183104
giovanniauriema1004@gmail.com

Fontana Stella
di Franca Norelli
Via Bocca,56
Frasso Telesino (Bn)
Tel. +39 347 9744898
f.norelli@hotmail.it

Nunzia Veronica Iannelli
Contrada Roseto
Benevento (Bn)
Tel. +39 338 8426556
collinadiroseto@tim.it

Giovanni Minicozzi
Contrada San Giuseppe
Paduli (Bn)
Tel. +39 334 3658173
giovanniminicozzi@gmail.com

Mirra
di Donatina Piacquadio
Contrada Paritola
San Nicola Manfredi (Bn)
Tel. +39 347 7663824
donatinapiacquadio@gmail.com

Pasquale Sagnella
Via San Salvatore, 28
San Lorenzello (Bn)
Tel. +39 320 8143273
Slow Food Coordinator
Giancarlo De Luca
Tel. +39 335 7288691
giancarlodeluca@tin.it

Territory

StateItaly
RegionCampania

Other info

CategoriesBread and baked goods