Andean Kañihua

Slow Food Presidium

Peru

Puno

Cereals and flours

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Andean Kañihua

Though perhaps the least-known Andean vegetable species, kañihua is highly important both for the land and inhabitants here. It is a plant from the family Amaranthaceae that only grows at altitudes above 3,800 meters on the southern belt of the Andes in Peru and on the Bolivian plateau. The kañihua reaches a height of about half a meter with bright red- and yellow-spotted leaves and shaft colored. The green parts of the plant are rich in calcium, a characteristic that proves important in times of drought.
It is a very hardy species that adapts well to dry, salty terrain and low temperatures conditions not uncommon on the Peruvian plateau.
However, the unique nature of this grass lies in its microscopic granules (about 1 millimeter in diameter) which are used to make fine brown flour, called kañihuaco in Quechua. This flour is used to make the oven-dried kispiño, cakes, refreshments, soups and even hot drinks.
Kañihua is 14-18% protein, with a high level of lysine (2.5 times more than in maize) and three other essential amino acids; therefore, it is a good substitute (if only partially) for animal by-products, such as milk, that can be difficult to obtain high in the Andes. The problem is that with the current methods of processing used by agro-industrial companies, it is impossible to evaluate the quality of the finished product. As a result, much of the nutritional value is being lost.
Kañihua was domesticated by the pre-Columbian people well before 1000 BC. Up until about ten years ago, the plant was still cultivated on 4,000 ha distributed between the Peruvian departments of Puno, Cusco, Apurimac and Huancavelica. Currently, however, cultivation has shrunk to 2,000 ha. Many farmers have chosen to grow more popular crops, like oats and medicinal herbs which are then used for dairy production.

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The Kañihua Presidium aims at saving the identity of this local cultivation and exploring new uses and economic outlets.
This means classifying and cataloguing local varieties and selecting those most suitable for activities that could be promoted locally and internationally.
The Foundation also directly supports the producers: in 2006 it helped purchase a small threshing machine suitable for collecting and cleaning kañihua, a process that currently results in significant losses in mass because of the plant’s fine granules. The next step has been purchasing an hammermill that will serve a small workshop to produce artisan byproducts: roasted kañihua flour (kañihuaco), biscuits and turrón, crisp grain and molasses bars.
The Presidium also focuses on promotional and educational initiatives targeting native communities in this area to spread awareness of kañihua’s nutritional value encourage.

Production area
Ayaviri, Cupi, Santa Rosa municipalities, Melgar province, Puno department

25 families of farmers members of Anpe (Asociación Nacional de Productores Ecológicos)

Asociación Nacional de Productores Ecológicos
www.anpeperu.org
Presidium coordinator
Rosario Ana Rejas Bermejo
tel. +51 51563048
charejas8@hotmail.com
The Kañihua Presidium aims at saving the identity of this local cultivation and exploring new uses and economic outlets.
This means classifying and cataloguing local varieties and selecting those most suitable for activities that could be promoted locally and internationally.
The Foundation also directly supports the producers: in 2006 it helped purchase a small threshing machine suitable for collecting and cleaning kañihua, a process that currently results in significant losses in mass because of the plant’s fine granules. The next step has been purchasing an hammermill that will serve a small workshop to produce artisan byproducts: roasted kañihua flour (kañihuaco), biscuits and turrón, crisp grain and molasses bars.
The Presidium also focuses on promotional and educational initiatives targeting native communities in this area to spread awareness of kañihua’s nutritional value encourage.

Production area
Ayaviri, Cupi, Santa Rosa municipalities, Melgar province, Puno department

25 families of farmers members of Anpe (Asociación Nacional de Productores Ecológicos)

Asociación Nacional de Productores Ecológicos
www.anpeperu.org
Presidium coordinator
Rosario Ana Rejas Bermejo
tel. +51 51563048
charejas8@hotmail.com

Territory

StatePeru
RegionPuno

Other info

CategoriesCereals and flours