Skrädmjöl

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Skrädmjöl (roasted oat flour) has a long tradition in the western region of Värmland. It is believed that Finnish settlers brought the product when they arrived to Värmland in the 17th century. Since the oats ripen only by late autumn, the grain easily gets molded. To avoid molding, the farmers started to roast the dry grains in large fire-heated stone ovens before milling them into flour which gives the product a nutty flavor. The ovens are fired with the wood from birch trees and the grains are turned constantly to prevent burning. Soon the process spread to local farmers but never outside Värmland—which is why it is important to protect it.

Since it is a complex handicraft that requires experience and expertise, there is only one mill that processes skrädmjöl. Large modern mills in the area were not able to meet the quality standards even if they tried to produce it.

There are several traditional dishes that use this flour: nävgröt (a porridge served with fried pork and lingonberry jam), mårbacka (ball-shaped sweet biscuit). For 4-6 servings of nävgröt boil 0.7 liters of water with 1 teaspoon of salt. Add 500 grams of skrädmjöl at once, enough to cover the water. Mash it, rather than stirring, as it should remain clumpy. Put a lid on it and simmer. Serve with pork, gravy and lingonberry jam.

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Territory

StateSweden
Region

Värmlands län

Other info

Categories

Cereals and flours

Nominated by:Maria Larsson
Arca del GustoThe traditional products, local breeds, and know-how collected by the Ark of Taste belong to the communities that have preserved them over time. They have been shared and described here thanks to the efforts of the network that Slow Food has developed around the world, with the objective of preserving them and raising awareness. The text from these descriptions may be used, without modifications and citing the source, for non-commercial purposes in line with the Slow Food philosophy.