Jarilud

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Jarilud is an herb that grows to around 2.5 meters in height, with elongated, green leaves. It flowers between September and October, and can be harvested throughout the year. The plant grows wild in dense forest areas. The leaves have a slightly sweet taste, with notes of bitterness that are reminiscent of arugula or rocket. It is considered a very refreshing herb. Jarilud is a wild plant, but over generations, people of the Bhoi community have domesticated it and begun growing it in their kitchen gardens. The plant does well in both warm and colder climates.   This herb is usually cooked along with local fish, both fresh and dried fish. When used with fresh fish, it is used to season a soup, together with onions. It can also be cooked as a curry with onions, ginger, garlic and pepper. Dried fish are made into a chutney where the fish is crushed coarsely with a grindstone into a paste and the jarilud leaves are just cut into thin strips and added along with onions, chilies and salt. In the past, in the village of Khweng, people would bring this herb along with on fishing trips, to use to season the fish they would catch and eat at lunchtime.   Jarilud can be found in the area of Madan Jyrlud in the district of the East Khasi Hills in Meghalaya, in northeastern India. Interestingly, this place (Madan Jyrlud) was named after this plant. The herb is not sold commercially, but instead gathered from the wild or harvested from personal gardens for home consumption. Unfortunately, over the years, people have begun to forget about jarilud, as only the elderly men and women (in particular the fishermen) are familiar with its taste and long association with the community. Today, the elders worry that younger generations have no interest in either domesticating jarilud or harvesting it from the forest.

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Territory

StateIndia
Region

Meghalaya

Other info

Categories

Spices, wild herbs and condiments

Indigenous community:Bhoi