Cebu Budbud Kabog

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Cebu Budbud Kabog

Budbud kabog or bingka dawa are the local words for suman, the Filipino word for a type of native cake. Kabog milled is used to make the cakes, which are the color of a bat (the literal meaning of kubog). The ingredients used to produce budbud kabog are produced locally in Cebu, in the centrally located Visayas Islands in the Philippines where the delicacy originated. Budbud kabog has a distinct texture and flavor, different from the usual rice native cakes that are commonly found in the Philippines.   To make the cakes, fresh kabog millet should be rinsed in two to three changes of fresh water, then drained. Coconut milk should be added do a pan and boiled until slightly reduced. The kabog is added to the coconut meat and constantly stirred for 30-35 minutes. About 20 minutes into the cooking time, sugar is added to taste. The variation called bingka dawa, produced with coconut wine instead of coconut milk has a smoother texture than those called budbud kabog, which are grainier. Budbud kabog is mainly made in the central northern areas of Cebu, while bingka dawa is more often found in the southwestern areas. The cakes are wrapped with native banana leaves and pared with tablea, a traditional thick chocolate drink.   Kabog millet is a native cereal of the Philippines and it’s use long pre-dates Spanish colonization. Local folklore has it that the grain was discovered by a farmer who found it in a bat cave. He cooked the millet, but his recipe was bland. After trying again after pounding the millet and adding sugar, he found a recipe that became the base of budbud kabog. Residents of the city of Catmon say that the delicacy was first sold at a tollbooth at Naghalin Bridge.   Today, the production of the kabog grain is dwindling. Catmonanons celebrate the Budbud Kabog Festival every February 10. Because it is made from the only millet variety in the Philippines, a decline in the availability of the primary ingredients threatens transformed products like budbud kabog. These days, it is usually only found for sale during certain days during the year, but is highly sought by tourists who have tasted this aromatic product. 

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Cakes, pastries and sweets

Indigenous community:Cebuano