Achak Almond

Ark of taste
Back to the archive >
Achak Almond

Louz Achak

The amande achak is a variety of almond historically cultivated in the courtyards of Sfax in eastern Tunisia. The trees are hardy, surviving long dry spells in the arid environment, but not particularly productive. The trees propagated by grafting. They are early bloomers, flowering in December with white or pinkish buds. The fruit is oblong and grooved along its entire body. The achak almond is often eaten during summer evenings served with mint tea. It is also used in creating an almond baklava, a traditional local sweet. The nuts have a higher oil and fat content than other varieties. However, the trees have been gradually replaced by more productive European and American varieties of almonds. The production areas where these almonds are still cultivated include the town of Sfax and the neighboring areas of Kairouanais and Sidi Bouzid in eastern and central Tunisia. They are also grown by some families for home consumption. However, only 5% of the almonds produced in the region belong to the amande achak variety (500 tons of the total production of 10,000 tons). Amande achak is sold at local markets for 25-50% higher prices than other almonds due to its rarity, and this variety is almost never exported.

Back to the archive >

Territory

StateTunisia
Region

Sfax